Oil Screen & gear lever - Honda TRX Forum
 
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post #1 of 4 Old 08-07-2019, 12:24 PM Thread Starter
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Oil Screen & gear lever

Hi,
I have just joined the forum and have a question about my 91 Big red 300 2WD. I have both engine covers off replacing the stator and centrifugel one way bearing. With the rhs side cover off, I cleaned the oil strainer. There were a lot of large plastic/rubber debris on the strainer, which I was concerned about. Has anyone else experienced this, or know what it could be, is it common? I was woundering if something somewhere had 'given up' and disintegrated, but not sure what.
Also, I know this is devisive, but my gear lever and shift shaft splines are worn badly and it was welded on. I ground it off ok, was going to replace but the shift shaft is discontinued and haven't been able so source one second hand in UK. I read on a forum somone had drilled through the lever and shaft and put a bolt through. Has anyone done this successfully? Because the shaft diameter is fairly small so would have to be a small bolt, was thinking putting a M5 bolt all the way through and putting a nut on it.

Thanks

Jon
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post #2 of 4 Old 08-07-2019, 01:13 PM
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The rubber material is from the cam chain tensioner or the cam chain guide or both. It's an indication that the engine has reached the end of it's useful life and is due for a complete rebuild. As the cam chain wears and the automatic tensioner mechanism can no longer apply the proper pressure on the tensioner, the cam chain moves from side to side and cuts the sides off the tensioner. Also, during acceleration, the chain will have slack in it where the chain is coming off the sprocket on the crankshaft. This slack chews the material away from the bottom of the tensioner and can expose the metal the tensioner material is bonded to. The cam chain and tensioner can be replaced without complete disassembly of the engine, but replacing the cam chain guide on the forward side of the can chain well requires removing the cylinder head.

As to the shift shaft; there are several on Ebay HERE is one sold by Power Sports Nation. They are a large salvage operation with a very good reputation. I buy from them occasionally. Drilling a hole and putting anything through it is temporary at best. I have done it and tried bolts, roll pins and solid drift pins. They all break is less time than you would expect them to. Besides welding, the only long term fix is to replace the shaft and the shift lever. When you do maintenance on the vehicle, always check the lever to assure it is tight on the shaft and the shaft will out live the machine.
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post #3 of 4 Old 08-12-2019, 12:35 PM Thread Starter
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Hi,
Thanks Here2Help for your speedy and knowledgeable response. Attached is a picture of the debris I found in the oil screen, does this defiantly look like the cam guide?
If it is, what would need doing, just the top end and how easy is it to do?
Thanks

Jon
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post #4 of 4 Old 08-12-2019, 08:22 PM
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Jon - that is the most damage I have ever seen done to the cam chain tensioner or guide - from the pic, I think it is the tensioner

I would expect you will find other problems when the engine is opened up - I recommend on a complete engine rebuild - this does not mean you are going to have to replace everything, but the engine need to be disassembled for a detailed inspection and cleaning - then when the wear/damage is assessed, a plan of attack can be drawn up so you will know the cost and approximate time it will take to complete. Either that or try to find a good used engine. Myself, I rebuild them rather than replace them, that way I know what I have and I know my rebuild will be at least as dependable as the original if not better.

It's not simple, there are special tools needed and a service manual is the Bible of engine repair. Don't try it without one. The engine will need to be removed from the frame.

Keep me posted on decision and progress
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