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Discussion Starter #1
Hey y’all! First post, stumbled across the forum while looking up another issue, and joined. Figured this would be the best place to ask about the new problem I have. I looked and I didn’t see anything specifically about this (but I’m also a little ‘special’ at times and may have missed it.

Here’s the problem: I installed a new set of clutch plates for the shift clutch, and a new drive/centrifugal clutch assembly a couple days ago. (Both were soaked in oil for a few hours prior to Installation.) When I shift into first or reverse, the machine will jump and die. If while in gear you stop the rear wheels (either coming to a full stop, or lock them up while moving), the engine dies. If you add a little gas and get it going and the let off the throttle completely, it will crawl along at an idle.

Here’s my thought - for some reason the centrifugal clutch is staying locked up at all times. I even tried lowering the idle to where it would barely stay running and it had the same issue. I also tried adjusting the shift clutch, but if I get it to the point where it won’t jump and kill the engine, the quad then won’t go anywhere as the shift clutch isn’t engaging. I also reopened and removed the drive clutch to inspect it and found nothing abnormal about it before reinstalling it and still having same issue.

Did I miss something somewhere? Is there a break-in procedure/period for a new clutch? Did I miss a washer or torque value maybe? Is it possible that the new clutch came with bad/wrong springs? Anyone else ever have this issue?

Any help or insight y’all might have would be greatly appreciated!
 

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There are 3 clutches; the centrifugal (works off crankshaft speed) - the manual clutch (released by the shift lever when shifting the transmission) ans the sprag clutch (provides engine braking during deceleration) - The problem has to be either the centrifugal or sprag clutch. Where did you get the replacement centrifugal unit ans what guide did you follow to install?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Replacement clutch was obtained from the local Honda parts dealer. As far as procedure, I followed what I found On YouTube and in another thread on here. It all went exactly as described in that thread, and exactly as in the few videos I saw. Was actually quite a bit easier than I expected it to be.
 

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You will have to take it apart and assemble it correctly - as you take it apart, examine the assembly as compared to the sequence in the breakdown pictured below. The troubleshooting guide is attached a little further down.

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Discussion Starter #6
Clutch is pulled, still looks near brand new. Guessing it’s the sprag clutch as there’s definite gap between shoes and drum when installed. Going to look online to see if there’s anyway to test the sprag before reassembly. If anyone has input I’m all ears!!
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Discussion Starter #7
Actually, disregard that, my special needs be kicking in 😂.

I didn’t realize the bearing I replaced right behind the centrifugal clutch was a one way bearing (aka the sprag clutch). So I put it in and just set the clutch in, and she only freely turns one way (clockwise, looking from the front of the engine) and refuses to turn the other direction. I know it wasn’t installed backwards (it’s got a lip that only allows it to
Seat in one direction), so I’m Starting to wonder if some dingus over-torqued it and locked it all together during reassembly.

BTW - it’s me, I’m some dingus.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ok y’all, remember at the start of this thread when I said I could be a little ‘special’ at times? Well.....it was me. It was always me.

After my last post I reassembled and spun everything by hand and something just wasn’t adding up: it was spinning clockwise, but to allow the centrifugal clutch to freewheel it would need to spin counter clockwise.

So I pulled the clutch again, and then pulled the drum so I could get a better look at the sprag clutch. After fiddling with it I realized something - it may have that little lip on it I referred to in my last post, but I was still able to flip it and place it in position. I had the stupid thing in backwards since I put the new clutch in. (In my defense there’s no directional arrow or anything on the part.)

Put it back together with the sprag clutch now in the correct direction, and now it runs just like it’s supposed to.

tl;dr - I’m a dork and had the sprag in backwards.
 

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That's kinda what I was thinking, but I wasn't going to tell you that you were 'special' - I've seen trained tech's do it only to have to do it over. At least you figured it out! Some MMI grads have to have the service manager show them after they had it apart and together 5 times and still never figured it out.

No, there is no arrow - an experienced mechanic just knows to check the operation before buttoning things up.
 

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Oh I’m definitely ‘special’ at times, you can say it hahaha. Glad to know I’m not the only one who’s done this. Check function before buttoning it up, lesson learned.
 

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(y) We all have to learn so I'll relate on of my early experiences; 1972 - I am a seasoned mechanic having worked in two other motorcycle shops - I am the head mechanic in a Kawasaki shop and have a college degree in electronics after growing up on a farm and serving in the Army (at this time I am still an active reservist). I repair the transmission in a H1 500 triple - I put the engine into the frame, put everything back together - the bike is ready for a test ride and I love test riding - I turn on the gas, put the choke on, turn the key on, push down on the kick starter and the engine comes to life, but............ the kick starter stays down. I shut the engine off and grab the kick starter by hand - it just flops - I raise it up and I hear the ratchet clicking, I get to the top of the stroke and let go of the lever - it falls back a bit and it is setting against internal gears - it does not seem to be connected to the return spring - I turn the key on, push the lever down and the engine starts, but the lever stays down - with the engine running, I raise the lever - it ratchets rapidly against the spinning gear inside the transmission - I get to the top of the stroke and let go - it just falls with no resistance. I immediately think the spring has broken which requires complete engine disassembly, so I proceed to disassemble the vehicle AGAIN. I get the engine out and apart - as I separate the cases, I look for the broken piece of spring in the notch in the cases where it is seated - there is nothing there - I examine the spring, it's fine - it appears that as I was setting the cases together and I pulled the down into the groove where it is held captive in the upper engine case, I apparently removed the pre-load tool prematurely and the spring escaped the groove. I re-seated the spring tang and installed the mating case removing the pre-load tool at the last moment. I put a couple case bolts in place and used the kick lever to turn the shaft - it rotated and turned the transmission shaft as designed and spring returned to the stop. I assembled, installed, started and test rode the bike with, to my relief, no further issues. I never again assembled a triple engine without checking the starter shaft to make sure it spring returned.

Over the years, I now turn every part to feel and observe movement and/or resistance as I assemble. On a V8 or other multi cylinder engine, I rotate the engine after installation of each rod and piston to assure freedom of movement and check for other things. I am pretty confident every engine I complete is correct and when started it will perform as expected. I rebuild the top end of my race bike on Sat night and go racing on Sun and have never broken down in the middle of a race - actually never have breakdowns - I do the maintenance and finish every race - rebuilding the engine is routine PM.

So I sympathize with you, I've done it, learned from it, try to avoid it, but realize it might happen again someday. No one is perfect.
 
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