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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello TRX Forums, I am a new member as of today and this will be my first post. I bought a 1987 Honda Fourtrax 350 and have been doing a ton of work to restore it and have it last another 30+ years (hah). I bought all new (shoes and springs) for the front brakes and bleed the system of the cruddy old brake fluid, but to my surprise only 1 of the cylinders was even moving out of the 4 of them. The 1 that moves has since blown open (I assume it needs new rubber parts from the rebuild kit and it's receiving way too much pressure since the other 3 are all seized when I pull the handle.

In summary, the pistons on the other 3 are frozen solid from rust and I haven't had much luck extracting them to swap them out with a rebuild kit since no new cylinders or even used ones for this model/year could be found. Are there any tips to getting these out without damaging the cylinders? I had hit them with PB blast and let it soak a few mins and had no luck prying them our with vice grips, etc. I am now soaking them in PB blast overnight, will try again, and if that doesn't work I will let them soak in it for a week or so.

Any tips, suggestions, etc. before I try to buy the rebuild kit since I am unable to pull the old parts out at this time anyways, thanks!

For context:
4322


Part number 14 is what is seized in the assembly, 20/21 part number removed just fine and I will be able to adjust those just fine if I can fix the rest of the setup. 14/22/1/28 all come as parts in a rebuild kit that I will purchase IF i can get the old pistons out.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Here is the currently soaking cylinders, you can see the adjustment side was all removed fine and I freed those up pretty well to the point they can certainly be re-used.
4321


ALSO 2nd issue is I replaced the shoes in the rear brake and greased it all up nice, and after cleaning out the brake cable from the hand lever I am able to use the rear brake with that hand lever, but the foot pedal is pretty well rusted/seized up to the point i need to smack it with a rubber mallet to engage and disengage it. I think I can just ignore the brake pedal and remove it even, but would it be worth it to fix it or just use the hand lever since I got that working, thanks!
 

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Welcome to the forum (y)

I've encountered the problem many times and have devised an almost foolproof method of disassembly.

First get a piece of brake line that fits the cylinder - affix a grease zerk to the line by solder, braze , weld or any other method of permanent attachment - install the special fitting to the fluid port of the cylinder - heat the cylinder to about 200 to 250 degrees and use a grease gun to pump grease into the cylinder hydraulically pressing the piston out - once the piston is removed, proceed to clean things.

Note: to make the cylinders work smoothly with no break-in - polish the cylinder bore by honing with 4 ought (0000) steel wool and aluminum polish.

The hand lever is a parking brake - it's not intended for primary application of the rear brake.
 

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Thank you I am sure I will be pretty active after I start running this beast on some trails after throwing it back together.

I am not 100% sure as to your method of how it looks, do you happen to have photos of any part of this process if you have done it yourself, that would help a lot. Either way thank you for the tip and I will try my best to replicate this method if I cannot pull them out after soaking them for a week or so.

As for the rear brake pedal, should any of the springs be replaced if the pedal is stiff to the degree I described, or any tips to free that up and grease it for functional use, or is it a bad brake cable, thanks again!
 

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Here's the one I made for calipers using a Banjo fitting - I can't find the one I made for inverted flare fittings, but I got one around here somewhere - I use it on Harley's and it may or may not fit Japanese units, but brake line is pretty standard around the world. Take a cylinder to an auto supply and ask for a brake line that fits - they will find one and all you have to do is get a zerk and affix it to the tube.

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What you said in your first post about blowing out seals with too much pressure - it won't happen - it would take to long to explain why, but don't worry about it. It would be a rarity if it did happen.

Myself, I would remove the brake pedal, sand, hone, bead blast, wire brush or whatever it takes to clean the rust off and out of the brake pedal pivot, grease it up and put it back together - lube the cable or replace it - whatever it takes to make it work right.

If it's worth fixing half assed, it's worth fixing half assed right.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Understood, thanks a lot for the feedback and I will post updates when I get time to work on these next week again!
 
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