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Just finished replacing the brushes on my starter as they have been worn out and no longer functioning. When I pulled off the starter reduction gear box to pull out the starter, a runny, milky white oil/grease came out of the gear reduction box. Thinking I had water in there, I changed the oil and only found a little bit of milky white in the oil change....nothing like what was coming out of the gear reduction box. Any information, suggestions on what I should do here? I have attached a picture to help explain the situation.
 

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You are right - it is water mixed with oil

Normally oil floats on water, but oil has EMULSIFIERS that break the surface tension of the water and allow it to break into very tiny droplets and then be held in suspension in the oil. This is normal for any engine, but is amplified in aluminum engines due to the porosity of the metal and a larger content of condensation that occurs as the engine warms.

To get rid of the water, an engine needs to be run long enough to get it warm enough to vaporize the water and the engine needs to have proper ventilation to draw the moisture laden air out.

Things you can do to reduce the collection of water in the oil: store the vehicle in a warm enclosure (heated garage), when you run the vehicle, run it for about an hour to ensure getting it hot enough to vaporize the moisture that condenses inside the engine and verify the crankcase vent hose is properly connected to the air box (or other engineered vacuum connection). Vehicles with the crankcase vent hose removed, low restriction air filters, modified air boxes or air intakes and vehicles run for short periods at low speeds will collect higher concentrations of water. And, the highest concentration of water will be in the part of the engine that takes the longest time to warm to full operating temperature. The starter reduction gear box is one of these areas.

It won't hurt anything unless it is allowed to collect and is not removed regularly. This is why it is recommended to change the oil more frequently in colder climates and it is not helping the vehicle to start it and let it idle for a few minutes during the winter. Engines that idle for long periods get more condensation in them than engines that are run at normal speed. The reason: idling engines do not have sufficient air flow through the crankcase to carry out the moisture laden air. If you are going to start it, ride it and ride it for at least 1/2 hour or more.

I have heard that synthetic oil will reduce the formation of condensation because it penetrates and fills the pores of the aluminum helping exclude water molecules, but I have not seen proof of this. I do know from personal experience that there seems to be less milky oil in my vehicles that I use synthetic oil in versus my vehicles that I use traditional mineral oil in.
 
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