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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There is to much play in the right brake lever so I tried adjusting the front brakes through the window, but couldn't get the adjuster to move. Removed the brake drum so I could see more clearly. At most the adjuster would only move a 1/4 of a turn which didn't appear to be enough adjustment. The lining is within the acceptable thickness. I'm not sure if the adjuster is faulty or if there is something else I am missing. Any ideas?
 

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Your adjusters should turn more than 1/4 turn. You will need to spray the adjusters with penetrating oil and disassemble them. You may have to clamp them in a vise and use a torch to heat them before you can get the adjuster wheel completely free of the threaded part. When you get them apart, wire brush them and put a little brake lube on the threads. If you can't get them apart, you will have to buy new adjusters. They can be a PITA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I took the wheel cylinders off and as you thought they were corroded. I wasn't able to get the adjuster and the threaded part to break lose. They one adjuster was so corroded that it won't even come out of the wheel cylinder. I am soaking them but have ordered new parts. I haven't looked at the left side, I'm imagining more of the same. Thanks for your clear explanations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Glad there are forums around like this. They are very helpful. As I learn more hope to be a contributor. I was finally able to break the adjusters apart on the right front. I soaked them for a couple of days in kerosene and then heated them with a torch and soaked them with penetreting oil. I used Never Seize to keep the problem from coming back. I took the right drum off and everything on that side worked smoothly. Appreciate the help.
 

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HI all! I did this and added new pads,but still have lots of play. what is the next step. Bleeding? any good links to a step by step? Oh ya I have a 2001 honda foreman fw 400
 

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I took the wheel cylinder off and as you thought they were corroded. I wasn't able to get the adjuster and the threaded part to break lose. They one adjuster was so corroded that it won't even come out of the wheel cylinder. I am soaking them but have ordered new parts. I haven't looked at the left side, I'm imagining more of the same. Thanks for your clear explanations.
how to get off the wheel cylinder on a car? i really need to remove mine. im glad that i saw this forum.
 

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When using anti-seize, keep in mind that it does not have a high tolerance for heat, and water will wash it off too. I have been in the automotive industry for 16 years, and have seen many cars come in with that stuff all over brake parts, it is pointless to use on a cars brakes. On a four wheeler there isnt much heat on the brakes unless you are an aggresive driver, so it shouldnt be a big deal. You still have the issue with water. If you ride like I do, you dont go around water, you go through it. The best thing to use is a silicone paste. Silicone will with stand alot of heat, and water will not wash it away like anti-seize. It is best if you put a thin layer of silicone paste on ALL moving parts of the brakes. Adjusters, the backing plate where the shoes rides, etc. Be careful, and DO NOT get silicone on the pad, or shoe lining. It can cause horrible noises when applying the brakes.
 

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I took the wheel cylinder off and as you thought they were corroded. I wasn't able to get the adjuster and the threaded part to break lose. They one adjuster was so corroded that it won't even come out of the wheel cylinder. I am soaking them but have ordered new parts. I haven't looked at the left side, I'm imagining more of the same. Thanks for your clear explanations.
how to get off the wheel cylinder on a car? i really need to remove mine. im glad that i saw this forum.
On the backside of the backing plate, there will be two bolts,(dependin on the car, some have clips) and the brake line. Remove them, then the wheel cylinders will pop out of the hole they sit in. My advice to you is, if you have to ask this question, pay someone who has done it before to do it. Brakes are a simple system, but it is VERY easy to mess them up....especially if you are going to open the system and let air into it like you will if you remove the wheel cylinders. If you do choose to tackle it, make sure you use a good brand of line wrench on the brake line to make sure they dont get rounded off. They can be hard to get off sometimes, and cheaper tools like Craftsman, or husky can stretch, and round it off.
 

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When using anti-seize, keep in mind that it does not have a high tolerance for heat, and water will wash it off too. I have been in the automotive industry for 16 years, and have seen many cars come in with that stuff all over brake parts, it is pointless to use on a cars brakes. On a four wheeler there isnt much heat on the brakes unless you are an aggresive driver, so it shouldnt be a big deal. You still have the issue with water. If you ride like I do, you dont go around water, you go through it. The best thing to use is a silicone paste. Silicone will with stand alot of heat, and water will not wash it away like anti-seize. It is best if you put a thin layer of silicone paste on ALL moving parts of the brakes. Adjusters, the backing plate where the shoes rides, etc. Be careful, and DO NOT get silicone on the pad, or shoe lining. It can cause horrible noises when applying the brakes.
I have been in the motorcycle industry repair business for over 30 years. I use Permatex Anti-Seize on brake parts (not the Copper or Nickel compounds) and to quote from their website:

Permatex® Anti-Seize Lubricant
A highly refined blend of aluminum, copper and graphite lubricants. Use during assembly to prevent galling, corrosion and seizing and to assure easier disassembly. Temperature range: -60°F to 1600°F (-51°Cto 871°C). Salt, corrosion and moisture resistant – ideal for marine use. Non-aerosol version meets Mil Spec #907E. Aerosol - Level 3*

It works very well for the application which is the subject of this thread.
 

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I stand corrected. I guess what needs to be stated here is....READ THE TOLERANCES BEFORE YOU USE. lol thanks for the post, here2help.
 
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